An interview with Ido Mor

About Ido Mor

Ido is a Strategic Director at Cheskin Added Value in Silicon Valley. He works at the intersection of design, research, and innovation. His systemic approach to untangling complexity is informed by an end-to-end understanding of the product & service development process with an emphasis on problem framing and knowledge visualization at its core. Ido has years of design and research consulting experience working in industries including healthcare, architecture, automotive and consumer electronics. Challenges have spanned the spectrum of ambiguity, from deconstructing perceptions of air, to charting the future of digital music. Ido studied Strategic Design Planning at the IIT Institute of Design with an emphasis on user-centered methodology. He has as undergraduate Industrial Design degree from the Rhode Island School of Design.

 

Main points

  • We always look for opportunities to engage a variety of stakeholders throughout a research project.
  • We ask stakeholders to voice their needs before we start actual field work.
  • We sometimes create a blog site for a project in which we provide project updates.
  • We invite our clients to update and add their thoughts and ideas in this blog.
  • We sometimes have a rolling list of ideas that come from the broader client team, the more immediate client stakeholders ,and our research team.
  • We invite stakeholders to join us in field work. We let them engage in conversations with research participants.
  • Clients who come to us have already crossed the barrier of understanding research is key to innovation and design.
  • Bought in higher ups help make the case with research and innovation.
  • We make PowerPoint presentations. Part of our deliverables is trying to think how to avoid creating PowerPoint presentations. We try to make it as experiential as possible.
  • We make beautiful posters that elegantly show research results.
  • We conduct workshop, and involve stakeholders in presenting results.
  • If stakeholders talk about research in non-research-oriented meetings and social situations in the office, that a good sign.