References and resources

Following is the list of references (that appear in the book) and resources.

 

Chapter 1: Selling UX research

Blank, S.G. (2005). The Four Steps to the Epiphany. Cafepress.com.

D'Hertefelt, S. (2000). 13 common objections against user requirements analysis, and why you should not believe them.

Earthy, J. V. (1998). Usability maturity model: human-centredness scale. IE2016 INUSE Deliverable D5.1.4s.

Gitomer, J. (2004). The Little Red Book of Selling. Bard Press.

Jarrett, C. (2000). Market research and usability. STC Usability SIG Newsletter, 7(1).

Nielsen, J. (2006a). Corporate usability maturity: Stages 1-4.

Nielsen, J. (2006b). Corporate usability maturity: Stages 5-8.

Nielsen, J. (2000). Why you only need to test with five users.

Ries, E. (2011). The Lean Startup: How today’s entrepreneurs use continuous innovation to create radically successful businesses. Crown Business.

Sauro, J. (2010). Why you only need to test with five users (explained).

Spool, J.M. (2011). Why I can’t convince executives to invest in UX (and neither can you).

Swartz, A. (2005). Another usability tool: Marketing. Usabilitynews.com.

Valskovits, P, & Cooper, B. (2010). The Entrepreneur Guide to Customer Development: A cheat sheet to The Four Steps to the Epiphany.

 

Chapter 2: Identifying research opportunities

There are no references for chapter 2. Nothing to see here. Carry on.

 

Chapter 3: Planning UX research with stakeholders

Caplan, S.H. (1990). Using Focus Group Methodology for Ergonomic Design. Ergonomics, 33(5).

McGinn, J. & Kotamraju, N. (2008). Data-driven Persona Development. CHI 2008 Proceedings, ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Florence, Italy, April 5-10, 2008.

Quesenbery, W. (2008). Choosing the right usability technique: Getting the answers you need. A workshop for User Friendly 2008 Conference, Shenzhen, China.

Sauro, J. (2005). Confidence Interval Calculator for a Completion Rate.

Tullis, T. & Albert, B. (2008). Measuring the User Experience: Collecting, Analyzing, and Presenting Usability Metrics. Burlington, MA: Morgan Kaufman.

 

Chapter 4: Collaborating with stakeholders

IDEO (2009). Field Guide in Human-Centered Design Kit.

Nielsen, J. (2003). 233 Tips and Tricks for Recruiting Users as Participants in Usability Studies.

Spool, J.M. (2007). Surviving Our Success: Three Radical Recommendations. Journal of Usability Studies, 2(4), pp. 155-161.

 

Chapter 5: Communicating UX research

Csikszentmihaly, M. (2004). Mihaly Csikszentmihaly on flow. In TED.com.

Molich, R. (2010). Usability test of www.towerrecords.com.

Nielsen, J. (1994). Usability Engineering. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.

Quesenbery, W., & Brooks, K. (2010). Storytelling for User Experience. New York: Rosenfeld Media.

Reynolds, G. (2008). Presentation Zen. Berkeley, CA: New Riders.

Tufte, E. (2005). The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Pitching Out Corrupts Within.

Tullis, T., & Albert, B. (2008). Measuring the User Experience: Collecting, Analyzing, and Presenting Usability Metrics. Burlington, MA: Morgan Kaufman.

Wilson, C., & Pernice Coyne, K. (2001). The Whiteboard: Tracking usability issues: To bug or not to bug?. Interactions, 8(3), pp. 15-19.

Wilson, C. (1999). Reader’s Questions: Severity Scale for Classifying Usability Problems.

 

Chapter 6: Measuring UX reseach buy-in

Lund, A. (2011). User Experience Management: Essential Skills for Leading UX Teams. Waltham, MA: Morgan Kaufmann.

Usabilitybok.org (2011). Usability Body of Knowledge website.

 

Miscellanious resources

tbd